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Sovereign Nations Series: Flags Symbolize National Identity for Tribal Nations and TCUs

June 14 is Flag Day, when the United States commemorates the adoption of the U.S. flag, reflective of the status of the U.S. as a sovereign nation. The Stars and Stripes, recognizable throughout the world, prompted me to think about the symbolism of flags and their representation of national identity, such as that the U.S. flag represents. Tribal flags are also representative of sovereign nations. The celebration of Flag Day a suitable time to share insights into our history and our contemporary lives as Tribal people.

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National Tribal Colleges and Universities Week March 13-19

National Tribal Colleges and Universities Week March 13-19 Tribal College and University Presidents, Students Address Legislative Priorities in Washington, D.C. Alexandria, Va., March 11, 2022 – The American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) is hosting its annual legislative summit March 14-18 in Washington, D.C., where Tribal College and University (TCU) presidents will convene both in person and virtually to address urgent legislative priorities for Native higher education....

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Sitting Bull College Student Chosen for Economic Leadership Summit

Sitting Bull College Student Chosen
for Economic Leadership Summit

Tristen Flying Horse, a business management major who is working towards a bachelor’s degree at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, North Dakota, was selected to participate in this year's NAFOA Leadership Summit. The summit is an opportunity for young leaders to attend a full day of programming prior to NAFOA's 40th Annual Conference. Summit attendees learn directly from tribal leaders and business professionals during programming that includes panel discussions regarding graduate school,...

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Bringing Native Voices to the National Conversation

Bringing Native Voices to the National Conversation

by Harley Interpreter, Indigenous Visionaries Fellow Yá’át’ééh shidine’é. Shí' éí Harley-Daniel Interpreter yinishyé. ‘Ádóone’é nishlínígíí éí Tł’ogí Dine’é nishłį, Dziłghá’í báshíshcíín, ‘Áshįįhí dashicheii, Tł’ízí Łání dashinálí. ‘Ákót’éego ‘éí ‘asdzání nishłį. Tsiiyi’ Be’ak’idéé’ naashá. 'Ółta’í nishłį. I am currently a student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology at Diné College, a tribal college (TCU). While attending school I work as the social media engagement agent in the...

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We Celebrate Native Women from All Tribal Nations Today!

We Celebrate Native Women from All Tribal Nations Today!

Happy International Women’s Day! Did you know there are 574 federally recognized Indian tribes in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska in the United States? Did you know that each Native Nation is a sovereign nation, with its own language, culture, teachings, spiritual practices, tribal government, court system, and more? The American Indian College Fund works with Native women from these tribal nations to ensure their access to a higher education. They have gone on to work as tribal leaders,...

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The Stories We Tell

The Stories We Tell

The American Indian College Fund is celebrating Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8) by highlighting several Native women who are making history today—by serving their communities and ensuring Native voices are heard—and valued.“I’ve come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my personal approach that creates the climate. It’s my mood that makes the daily weather.” Haim Ginott  by Sandy Packo, Iñupiaq, College...

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The Night Watchman

The Night Watchman

by Melissa Silver Centered around the threat of the U.S. Government termination of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa tribe in North Dakota, Louise Erdrich’s novel The Night Watchman takes us on an Indigenous journey inspired by her grandfather, Patrick Gourneau, a former tribal chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa and a night watchman. Gourneau serves as the inspiration for one of the protagonists, Thomas Wazhhashk, whose last name means muskrat in the Ojibwe language. Thomas is...

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