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American Indian College Fund News

  • The Coca-Cola Foundation and the College Fund Honor First-Generation Scholarship Recipients
    The Coca-Cola Foundation and the College Fund Honor First-Generation Scholarship Recipients
    March 16, 2015
    The Coca Cola Foundation and the American Indian College Fund honored 36 American Indian scholarship recipients at its 2014-15 Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship banquet at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Student Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship was established to fund unmet need for a student’s first year in college. If students maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average and show strong participation in campus and community life, their scholarships are renewed every year throughout the students’ tribal college career. The Coca-Cola Foundation and the College Fund Honor First-Generation Scholarship Recipients
  • Tribal College President and Students Honored by the College Fund and Adolph Coors Foundation
    Tribal College President and Students Honored by the College Fund and Adolph Coors Foundation
    March 16, 2015
    The American Indian College Fund will honor American Indian scholarship recipients at its 2014-15 Student of the Year reception at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium Student Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The program, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Foundation, awarded each honoree a $1,000 scholarship. The program also honors a faculty or staff member at a tribal college and university for their leadership.
  • College Fund Takes Gen-I Challenge, Pledges Support for White House Initiative for Native Youth
    College Fund Takes Gen-I Challenge, Pledges Support for White House Initiative for Native Youth
    March 13, 2015
    The American Indian College Fund Takes Gen-I Challenge, Pledges Support for White House Initiative for Native Youth
  • AT&T Grows Next Generation of Native American Leaders Through 22-Year Partnership
    AT&T Grows Next Generation of Native American Leaders Through 22-Year Partnership
    March 9, 2015
    Waylon Ballew (Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation/Northern Cheyenne) believes tradition is an important part of higher education. In order for him to be a community leader, Waylon said he must carry his traditions forward for future generations. Growing up on Bellingham Bay in northwest Washington state, Waylon said he was immersed in community youth leadership programs, where he incorporated leadership training in community youth tribal canoe journeys as he traveled ancestral waterways to potlatches (gatherings).
  • Policy and Education Experts to Speak on Native Family Engagement in Early Childhood Education
    Policy and Education Experts to Speak on Native Family Engagement in Early Childhood Education
    March 8, 2015
    William (Bill) Mendoza, Executive Director of the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, Oglala-Sicangu Lakota, and a professional educator with experience as a teacher and a principal, is speaking at the American Indian College Fund’s convening on Native Family Engagement as part of The Ké’ Early Childhood Initiative (Ké’ ECE Initiative) in Albuquerque, New Mexico, being held March 9-10.
  • Cheryl Crazy Bull to Discuss Presidential Community College Initiative On-Air
    Cheryl Crazy Bull to Discuss Presidential Community College Initiative On-Air
    January 30, 2015
    Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, will be interviewed on the radio program Native America Calling on Monday, February 2 at 11 a.m. Mountain Time. She will be discussing President Obama's Community College Initiative and the importance of tribal colleges, along with Russ McDonald, President of United Tribes Technical College and William Mendoza, White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education.
  •  College Fund Recruits New Faculty Fellowships Program Officer
    College Fund Recruits New Faculty Fellowships Program Officer
    January 12, 2015
    Makomenaw comes to the College Fund from Montana State University, where he was an assistant professor of Native American Studies. Prior to his position in Montana, he served as the director of the American Indian Resource Center at the University of Utah. He also served as a graduate assistant with the ASHE/Lumina Fellows Program at Michigan State University, and was the director of Native American Programs at Central Michigan University.
  • College Fund President Addresses Association of Community College Trustees
    College Fund President Addresses Association of Community College Trustees
    December 22, 2014
    : This fall American Indian College Fund president and CEO Cheryl Crazy Bull addressed the Association of Community College Trustees. You can view her speech here to learn about American Indians in higher education, the history of the founding of tribal colleges and universities, and the important role they play in providing Native Americans with access to a higher education while revitalizing Native communities.
  • Supporters Age 70 ½ and Older May Take IRA Charitable Rollover for 2014
    Supporters Age 70 ½ and Older May Take IRA Charitable Rollover for 2014
    December 18, 2014
    Yesterday, the Senate passed the “Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014,” (HR 5771) which includes an extension through December 31, 2014 of the IRA Charitable Rollover.
  • Why Tribal Colleges Matter: Our Response to The Hechinger Report
    Why Tribal Colleges Matter: Our Response to The Hechinger Report
    December 16, 2014
    Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, wrote a response to both The Hechinger Report and The Atlantic in regard to an article both magazines published by the writer, Sarah Butrymowicz, which stated that tribal colleges were a poor return on taxpayer money. The College Fund presents the full statistics and socioeconomic details to support why tribal colleges are not only important in the lives of Native students, but are also making a tremendous impact.