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  • Youth the focus during President’s visit to Standing Rock
    June 27, 2014
    President Barack Obama’s million-megawatt smile shined brightest for children and young people on his visit to the Standing Rock Dakota/ Lakota Nation. Upwards of 2,000 tribal members gave the President and First Lady Michelle Obama a warm welcome June 13 in the dance arbor of the tiny village of Cannon Ball for the community’s annual Flag Day Celebration.
  • Grant awarded for maize research FOUR TRIBAL COLLEGES INVOLVED
    June 26, 2014
    The project will build capacity at the colleges for maize breeding and seed saving. Regular maize-breeding workshops will be conducted, along with field days and variety evaluations. Survey information will also be collected. Partners in the project are Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND; Stone Child Community College, Box Elder, MT; Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND; United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck, ND; and Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society, LaMoure, ND.
  • Fort Peck Tribes Mourn Death of one of Their Founders
    June 25, 2014
    The Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation were saddened by the death of Tribal Executive Board vice chairwoman Annette “Ann” Lambert, Friday, June 20. Lambert, 62, was in her second term on the board. She was reelected in October 2013. A prepared statement from the Fort Peck Tribes said Lambert dedicated her life to the service of her people, including as one of the founders of Fort Peck Community College, working for the National Congress of American Indians in Washington, D.C., as a 20-year volunteer member of the Tribes Higher Education board of directors, director of A&S Oil and Gas, as assistant to the tribal chairman, and managing a joint venture construction company which assisted in the construction of facilities on the Northern Border Pipeline which runs through the Fort Peck Reservation, various highway projects, and the construction of the Chief Redstone Clinic in Wolf Point.
  • San Carlos Apache Set to Establish a Tribal College
    June 23, 2014
    The San Carlos Apache Tribe has announced that it will partner with Arizona State University (ASU) in establishing its own tribally controlled college. The new tribal college will be the first Apache-controlled institution of higher education. “A tribal college operated by and for Apaches will help secure the future of the tribe, not just as a means for sustainable economic development, but as a critical institution to preserve our language, our culture, and our history,” stated tribal chairman Terry Rambler.
  • Financial Help Not Likely on Horizon for Tribal Colleges
    June 22, 2014
    When the president and first lady recently arrived by helicopter at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, they made history. President Barack Obama is the third sitting U.S. president to visit an Indian reservation in the past eight decades. The Obamas took part in a Flag Day ceremony and met with Dakota and Lakota nation youth during their June 13 visit. Addressing the crowd, Obama promised a renewed commitment to American Indian interests, with a particular focus on education. “Let’s put our minds together to improve our schools, because our children deserve a world-class education, too, that prepares them for colleges and careers. And that means returning control of Indian education to tribal nations with additional resources and support so that you can direct your children’s education and reform,” said Obama.
  • College Fund awards LLTC with three year $50,000 Traditional Arts Grant
    June 21, 2014
    The American Indian College Fund has awarded Leech Lake Tribal College with a three-year grant of $50,000 through a program designed to increase the intergenerational transfer of artistic and cultural knowledge and processes from elders to adults and children and to provide direct support for Native artists, while stemming the tide of lost and endangered cultural art forms in tribal communities. Leech Lake Tribal College was one of four selected, also selected were Oglala Lakota College, Turtle Mountain Community College, and Sinte Gleska University. Congratulations to them as well!
  • Northern Cheyenne women learn the lost art of brain-tanning buffalo
    June 20, 2014
    Clouds collect over Inyan Kara Mountain while a gentle breeze combs through the waist-high buffalo grass near the banks of Redwater Creek as six women from the Northern Cheyenne Reservation are elbow-deep in brains, tanning their first buffalo hide. “This makes your hands so soft,” one woman says to her college comrades and they all giggle.
  • Senator Murkowski Speaks on Native Language Programs
    June 19, 2014
    US Senator Lisa Murkowski spoke Wednesday at a committee meeting in Washington, DC about her Native American Languages Reauthorization Act of 2014. KDLG’s Thea Card has more. Senator Murkowski shared her personal connection in wanting to enhance Native language learning in Alaskan schools. She explained that when she placed her children in an immersion school in Anchorage, it was difficult to get respect and support from districts for those schools.
  • President of Oglala Lakota College Testifies Before Indian Affairs Committee
    June 18, 2014
    The Senate Indian Affairs Committee held a hearing this afternoon on the Native Language Immersion Student Achievement Act (S. 1948) and the Native American Languages Reauthorization Act (S. 2299). Mr. Thomas Shortbull, president of the Oglala Lakota College in Kyle, South Dakota, testified before the committee. - See more at:
  • American Indian College Fund Awards Grants to Preserve and Restore Native Art Forms
    June 17, 2014
    The American Indian College Fund has awarded four three-year grants of $50,000 each to tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) in the upper-Midwest through a program designed to increase the intergenerational transfer of artistic and cultural knowledge and processes from elders to adults and children. The grants also provide direct support for Native artists, while stemming the tide of lost and endangered cultural art forms in tribal communities. The program is funded by a grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.